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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)
japan's tensions with china were very much in the forefront. >> suarez: our week long focus on guns, "after newtown" wraps up tonight with a report from chicago on the public health crisis in the city in the wake of rising gun violence. >> the people who come in after having been shot are some of the highest risk folks. these are people who have been shot, who may have been shot before, and really without some intervention, without some life- changing moment, the trajectory's either going to be jail or death. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> suarez: and, as a magistrate grants oscar pistorius bail, we talk to charlayne hunter gault about how his arrest has focused attention on the unusually high rate of violence against women in south africa. >> domestic violence is shot through the entire society from the highest of the highed in socioeconomic terms to the lowest of the low. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new yo
: still to come on the "newshour": china concerns at the u.s.-japan summit; a public health crisis linked to gun violence; shields and brooks and violence against women in south africa. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a winter storm headed east today, after socking the plains with snow, sleet and freezing rain. it was already blamed for four deaths, flight disruptions and hundreds of road accidents. the huge system was moving north and east, and losing some of its punch. but it was still expected to make trouble in the northeast and new england this weekend. the sounds of snowblowers roaring to life and shovels scraping the driveway could be heard in state after state today. much of the nation's mid-section spent the day digging out from more than a foot of snow and for drivers, it quickly turned into an icy nightmare. the highly unsettled storm also brought lightning and thunder, but it was the snow falling at two inches an hour in places that caused the worst problems. kansas city mayor sly james said it was the pace that was hard to deal w
the motivations behind what appear to be china's systematic targeting of foreign firms and governments. >> woodruff: then, we turn to today's arguments at the supreme court over a patent case with implications for biotechnology giant monsanto, and a range of fields from medical research to computer software. >> ifill: we continue our weeklong focus on guns, "after newtown." tonight jeffrey brown reports on the possible links, if any, between violent video games and violent behavior. >> the result clearly shows that playing a violent video game increases aggressive behavior. >> one of the problems in this field is that people confuse aggression and violence. >> woodruff: and margaret warner gets an update on the oscar pistorius murder trial in south africa, as the prosecution and the defense lay out conflicting accounts of the events leading to his girlfriend's death. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedi
china and its military. the newest allegations of cyber attacks by the chinese government came up at the white house today. reporters asked spokesman jay carney about a study that blames china's military for a large-scale years-long hacking campaign. >> we have repeatedly raised our concerns at the highest levels about cyber attacks with senior chinese officials, including in the military, and we will continue to do so. >> woodruff: the report alleges this nondescript 12-story office building is the locus of the hacking. it's situated in shanghai and is run by unit 61398, a bureau within the general staff of the people's liberation army. a virginia-based security firm, man yant corporation, traced the hacking there and concluded it is one of the most prolific cyber espionage groups in terms of the here is quantity of information stolen. man yant said the chinese stole reams of information from u.s. military contractors, energy companies, the aerospace and telecommunications industry and others. in beijing, a chinese government spokesman called the report "groundless" without addre
coincided with an investigation it did that found relatives of wen jiabao, china's prime minister, had accumulated several billion dollars through their business dealings. for more on all this, i am joined by "new york times" reporter, nicole perlroth, who reported the story in today's paper. and grady summers, vice president of mandiant, the cyber security company hired by the "times" to investigate the breach. nicole perlroth, let's start with you. how did the paper realize that it was under attack and could it immediately move to defend itself? >> we were actually -- this was a proactive effort by the "new york times." we knew the story was coming out. we knew there had been warnings about publication of the investigation into wen jiabao's relatives would quote/unquote have consequences. so our security team notified at&t which monitors our network full time to look out for unusual activity and we notified them a day before the story published and the day the story went online at&t got back to us and said that they had noticed that at least three of our computers were communicating
laws. >> brown: even china, the north's lone major ally voiced its, quote, staunch opposition. it urged north korea to return to its six party talks on its nuclear program stalled since 2008 but pyongyang has continued its nuclear work despite enter smat pressure. with today's test, the country's young leader kim jong-un directly challenged other leaders in neighboring nations including south korea, japan and china. back in washington, outgoing defense secretary leon panetta warned that those countries and the uses will have to contend with, quote, rogue states for some time. >> you just saw what north korea has done in these last few weeks. the missile test and now a nuclear test. they represent a serious threat to the united states of america. we've got to be prepared to deal with that. >> steven: north korea's own public statement insisted today's test was only a first response. it said it will be additional actions to come but gave no specifics. >> brown: and i'm joined by ambassador charles "jack" pritchard, former u.s. special envoy for north korea negotiatons under president geor
that the intelligence community now believes the u.s. is a target of a major cyber espionage campaign, with china as its most aggressive perpetrator, seeking to steal data for economic gain. to counter these efforts, president obama announced a new initiative. >> i signed a new executive order that will strengthen our cyber defenses by increasing information sharing and developing standards to protect our national security, our jobs, and our privacy. >> suarez: the national cyber- security and communications integration center is in northern virginia. it's the department of homeland security's premiere cyber-space monitoring facility. this command center receives information from companies like at&t and verizon, and watches over the government's information networks. lawrence zelvin, the center's director, says the president's order will make it easier to combat cyber threats. >> the attacks should be measured in seconds, not days. the attacks are ever present and ongoing, and as i said, there's a variety of motivations-- criminal, nation-state, malicious, humorous. the attacks are happening in seconds.
... to move oil around, is the best approach. to move that oil to the west and send it to china on tankers that are fueled by diesel, it leaves a much greater carbon footprint. in addition, that oil will make it to the united states, whether there's a keystone pipeline or not. in the event it makes it to the united states it will come by other forms of transportation which are far less energy-efficient, thus deepening that footprint. >> woodruff: you're saying it would go to other countries and then come... >> i would say there are two options. it's either going to go to china or come to the united states. in either event the carbon footprint will be deeper. the further point about whether or not an oil pipeline somehow endangers the land which it crosses i think has been asked and answered so many times it's no longer a relevant consideration. look, the map of the united states is literally a spider web of oil and product pipelines. >> woodruff: you're saying already. >> already. the fact of the matter is the chances of sustaining a spill of oil out of an oil pipeline is 1 quarter the amo
against china. but if you look at how that translates into policy, i think there is a bigger problem. she was very good going out to a country, soothing ruffled feathers, for example, with officials in afghanistan and pakistan. and speaking out to the public. but what kind of a lasting impact did it have. for example in pakistan where i was there when she deflected criticism, angry shouts from students and she had them eating out of her hands. but in pakistan the government is still providing shelter for the taliban. and there's still no real solid ra approachment between us and then. so it is very hard to see that her soothing, her repairing of applianc appliance-- alliances necessarily resulted in concrete policy achievements. >> suarez: susan, wasn't it a pretty complicated mess, not only where places as trudy knows, like pakistan, but even with some of america's closest allies. >> well, that's exactly right. i mean these are times where, you know, you play the hand you are dealt as secretary of state not only because the white house decides the big picture policy. but the world over t
ambassador to china. critical issues await them, from action on climate change, to the keystone x-l oil pipeline, to negotiations on new trade agreements with a dozen nations, and the european union. the president set the tone for the selections to come, with his description of jewell today. >> she knows the link between conservation and good jobs. she knows that there's no contradiction between being good stewards of the land and our economic progress, that in fact, those two things need to go hand-in-hand. >> ifill: the immediate response to jewell's nomination was positive -- from business and environmental groups alike. we get more now on the president's second-term cabinet and the issues they will face from coral davenport, energy and environment correspondent for "national journal." greg ip, u.s. economics editor for the economist and julie rovner, health policy correspondent for national public radio. you each cover different parts of this administration, different parts of the government, starting with you and with the selection today of sally jewell, carl, what are the big issu
japan, china, india have reduced the economic contact and the sanction which is were implemented yesterday is that iran has had a much more difficult time producing and exporting oil and oil is 80% of its export revenue. the sanction which is took effect yesterday make it much more difficult for iran to get paid for the oil it does export. so over the last several years their oil revenue has dropped more than 50%, inflation has skyrocketed, their currency has tail spined. but we still haven't seen that economic malaise have an impact on the supreme leader's nuclear calculation. >>. >> brown: what can be said as far as an impact the sanctions are having at this point? >> they've had an adverse effect on the population. people are having difficulty getting access to medicine. the quality of life for most people has dropped precipitously. but, again, the intent of sanctions is to try to subject iran to enough pressure so the leader will feel what i would describe as existential angst. that either he these do a flauk leer deal or the regime itself could be in peril. and there's no si
voice is among thousands performing in china's new year television spectacular. we get the first ever backstage glimpse of rehearsals. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. the birthplace of the arab spring is facing its biggest crisis since its revolution two years ago. tens of thousands of mourners attended the funeral procession in tunisia of the murdered opposition politician chokri belaid, a political
gets cheaper by the year. let's drive down costs even further. as long as countries like china keep going all in on clean energy, so must we. in the meantime, the natural gas boom has led to cleaner power and greater energy independence. we need to encourage that. that's why my administration will keep cutting red tape and speeding up new oil and gas permits. that's got to be part of an "all of the above" plan but i also want to work with this congress to encourage the research and technology that helps natural gas burn even cleaner and protects our air and our water. in fact much of our new found energy is drawn from lands and waters that we, the public, own together. so tonight i propose we use some of our oil and gas revenues to fund an energy security trust that will drive new research and technology to shift our cars and trucks off oil for good. if a nonpartisan coalition of ceos and retired generals and admirals can get behind this idea, then so can we. let's take their advice and free our families and businesses from the painful spikes in gas prices we put up with for far too
.s., britain, france, russia and china plus germany-- was catherine ashton of the european union. >> i hope that the iranian side are looking positively on the proposals that we've put forward. we work extremely hard in a very considered manner collectively on behalf of the united nations security council who mandate us to do so in order to try and get >> warner: far from almaty, secretary of state kerry said in paris that the talks had been useful, but he also reiterated the u.s. position. >> iran knows what it needs to do. the president has made clear his determination to implement his policy that iran will not have a nuclear weapon. >> warner: and in jerusalem, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu called again for the threat of military measures. >> i believe that this requires the international community to ratchet up its sanctions and make clear that if this continues there will be also a credible military sanction. i think no other means will make iran obey the wishes of the international community. >> warner: iran insists its nuclear program is for peaceful energy production, no
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)